Week 3 in the Surrogator, Visitors and the Next Location

There were only two dead wild quail chicks this week so we’re down to 101 chicks in the surrogator.

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The wild quail chicks appear to be healthy and growing quickly.

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It is very important to adjust the height of the watering bar each week. The bottom of the watering nipples needs to be at eye level. It’s a bit of a challenge because you need to get down at their eye level and be patient to get the right height.

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I use a Bushnell Game Camera to keep an eye on what’s happening when I’m not there. This is the first time I’ve seen raccoons visit. The Surrogator is very secure and they didn’t do any damage to the birds or the equipment.

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I’m planning on running as many as four cycles of wild quail chicks this summer so I need to prepare a new location. This location has plenty of shade, relatively low wind and is near to some great quail habitat. We cleared the underbrush and poisoned the smaller weeds.

Feeling like you walked in on the middle of a conversation?  Read about Week 1 in the Surrogator and Week 2 in the Surrogator.

 

Update

Get caught up on the wild quail chicks’ experience in Week 4 in the Surrogator

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Week 2 in the Surrogator

Seven wild quail chicks died during the second week so the count in the Surrogator is now down to 103.

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The two week old wild quail appear to be very healthy and growing quickly.

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There also appears to be plenty of room for them in the surrogator.

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My bird dog appears to be particularly interested in the process – imagine that!

 

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I’ve also scouted the location for Round 2 of surrogating wild quail. Next week I will take some extra time and clear the brush in Location #2.

Feeling like you walked in on the middle of a conversation?  Read about Week 1 in the Surrogator

 

Update

Get caught up on the wild quail chicks’ experience in the surrogator:

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Selecting the Location

The location in the field for raising wild quail chicks in a Surrogator is very important. Specifically, there are a couple of criteria that are critical.
  1. They must be located in a shady spot to prevent overheating
  2. The N/S/E/W orientation must be with the brooder end facing the prevailing wind direction to prevent the heater from being blown out and protect the chicks from drafts.

We located a nice spot under a pair of trees with the proper wind orientation in the pasture. We selected this location for three reasons.

  1. The habitat in the general vicinity appeared to be good for quail – enough forbs and insects and sufficient cover from predators
  2. It was relatively easy to get to.

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Deer Pea Vetch as an example of forbs that wild quail need.

 

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The shady spot cleared between two trees with the proper wind orientation.

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